Category Archives: website traffic

6 Quick Reasons for Your Website Traffic Drop

young businessman upset because of drop in website trafficWebsite traffic monitoring tools (like Google Analytics) give business owners the power to gauge website traffic—but it comes with a downfall. Business owners can see when website traffic increases (yeah!) and drops suddenly (bad). (It is important to note that every website experiences periodic decreases in website traffic.) A sharp (and continual) drop in website traffic interrupts reaching marketing goals and occurs for an infinite number of reasons.

Not every busy business owner has time to sift through an endless list of reasons for a website traffic drop, especially when every minute is incredibly valuable. This list of the most common reasons for drops in website traffic can give any website owner a start in correcting the problem (and, hopefully, a resolution). For a full analysis, contact professionals that can diagnose the issue and recommend future actions that resolve the issue and enhance current marketing efforts.

Data Error

Sometimes the reason for a drop in website traffic is not related to traffic at all. The actual reason for the sudden decrease occurs because of an error with the measurement tool.

Search engine giant Google lists an incorrect URL as one of the most common reasons. This problem can easily be fixed by double checking every character of the URL entered. One letter or an incorrect character can be the source of a data problem.

The drop can also be attributed to an incorrect report, such as the wrong type of report or dates. A second glance at the report can minimize any panic attacks or headaches. When using Google Analytics, ensure that the report reflects the desired data time (i.e. hourly, daily, monthly).

Crawling Delay

Search engines continuously crawl the web and index website pages. Google gives a brief overview of the process in this article. Most website owners expect that continual process to occur immediately, especially after requesting a website crawl. In reality, there can be delays in crawling and indexing. If the website is not indexed seven days after the request, it may be time to get more information.

The process for finding out if a website or page has been indexed is a simple one. Simply, open a browser and do a search for the website URL. Again, ensure that the URL is accurate. If the website is not indexed, the next step is to request a website crawl or contact the professionals to find out if there is a reason for the oversight.

Website Change

There are several changes to a website that can show up as a website traffic drop. A website outage or interruption in service can trigger a drop in website traffic.

More drastic changes are also a source of a decrease in website traffic. A major change in website structure or a broken link (or many broken links) can trigger a drop in website traffic. Broken links, which occur when users get an error message instead of a page, are a major culprit in website traffic drops.

A loss in backlinks, which are links to the website from other sources, can also cause a sharp decrease to show up on the website traffic graph. Backlinks are an important ranking factor to search engines. For that reason, backlinks should be checked periodically to monitor this situation.

Search Engine Penalty

The sooner a business recognizes a search engine penalty, the sooner the recovery process can begin. A sharp decrease in website traffic can be a sign of a search engine penalty. Search engine penalties can be issued because of user-generated spam, duplicate content, broken links, and redirects. (A full list of reasons for search engine penalties can be found in this article.) The exact reason can be found in the Google Search Console. Businesses should make every effort to initiate the recovery process as soon as possible, or consult a search engine firm that can assist and recommend other ways to generate website traffic.

Algorithm Changes

Search engines use a complex formula to determine website rankings. Periodically, these algorithms are changed, such as when preference was given to mobile-friendly websites. Search engine firms typically stay on top of these changes (it is, literally, their jobs) and can prepare websites for the change without a website traffic drop. Unless business owners and managers plan on staying on top of every algorithm change, it makes cents (literally, pun intended) to consult with or outsource to a search engine firm with experience and expertise.

Competition Change

This may be the most annoying reason for a website traffic drop. Sometimes website traffic is lost to other competitors. When this occurs, an analysis of the situation is the next step. Answer these questions: 1) What website is now receiving the website traffic? 2) Why is this site receiving the website traffic? These questions can be answered with search engine tools or by consulting a search engine firm with the tools. The end result of the analysis should get marketing results—and a return of that invaluable website traffic.

10 Concrete Ways to Get More Website Visitors

crowd of shoppers who want to visit websitesMarketing gurus can talk in all the concepts all they want (guilty!), but this blog post is not about concepts.  This list is all about more concrete, hard-and-fast ways to get more visitors to your website—and logically, to turn those visitors into paying customers.

Make sure your website is worth the visit(s).

Let’s be clear: you are not going to get meaningful website traffic that increases sales unless you have a solid website.  A solid website is well-organized, has information written specifically for your audience (if you can’t, contact the pros that can), loads pages quickly, and has an easy-to-use contact site that visitors can use (more must haves for a solid website here).  Many a business has tried to promote a crappy website only to find their initial traffic numbers have gone up—but so has their bounce rate (the number of customers leaving their website quickly).

Add your website URLs as the call-to-action in your content marketing pieces.

Content marketing is a powerful piece of marketing; writing content about relevant topics that you can share builds trust with your audience and search engines.  That content also gives you a logical place to include your website URLs.  Think about it: if you write about a problem you can solve, or something you can help with, it makes cents (pun intended) to link the call-to-action (i.e. for more information, if you have any questions, etc.) to your website where they can contact you for help.

Optimize your website pages.

If you want to get to your customers, you’re going to need to charm a powerful tool that’ll get you there: search engines.  Write your website content with two audiences in mind (or hire pros who can): your customers and search engines.  Include well-written, optimized, relevant content to keep everyone happy (including yourself when you gain website traffic).

Include website page links in your next email.

Email marketing is a marketing tool with one of the highest return-on-investments—if you build your email list the right way.  Once you have a solid email list full of people who want to receive your communications, make sure you catch their attention with creative headlines and direct people logically to your website for information.  Note: that doesn’t mean you should fill your email full of random website links.  Instead, add them in logically to your email text (or use your content marketing pieces in your email) so your users understand what you want them to do.

Use optimization to get your website to the top.

When users have questions or need information, they go to the top search engines (Bing, Google, Yahoo) and ask.  Website optimization gets your website on page one (if done right and with the right technology) so users can find your website (and your content) easily.  If you are a local business, you can target your website optimization efforts even tighter; top local SEO firms can get your website at the top of user’s searches within a 10, 20, or 50 mile radius of your location.

 Add a website page URL to your postcards.

Adding your website to your postcards, direct mail pieces, and brochures should be common practice.  If you have a page where your customers and potential customers can (and want to) interact with your business, add the website URL and an easy-to-scan graphic to get them to your page.

Share your website on social media.

In the middle of all the sharing business pictures and funny memes, it’s easy to forget to share pages from your website.  Make sure that your website is a place people want to go to, and add sharing pages from your website to your marketing plan.  For example, if you have a page full of coupons, videos, tips, and discounts, let your customers and potential customers know—and make it easy for them to visit the page from social media.

Make your website part of your next video.

Video is the future, so use it to your advantage.  You don’t have to make a whole video and jump around and scream your website URL.  Instead, make a video with a purpose (as part of a campaign in your marketing plan) and logically insert your website URL as part of the video.  For example, if you are making a video about an event, add a page to your website with information and a call-to-action (or put it on social media) and include the URL in your video.

Invest in social media ads.

Social media advertising can be a powerful way to promote your website, if you make it relevant.  Social media ads are not a billboard; you need to craft an ad that people (your targeted audience) want to click on to make it effective.

Include your website URL EVERYWHERE.

We admit this isn’t a hard-and-fast tactic, but it’s time to start thinking about your website as part of your business instead of an isolated marketing tactic (more ideas for integrated tactics here).  If you have a solid website, put it to work.  You’ll be glad you did—and so should your customers.