6 Effective Ways to Make Your Local Business Stand Out

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

sale sign in business window trying to attract local customers with marketingToday’s customers have a lot of places they can spend their money. Online websites, local stores, big box stores…there an overwhelming number of places for consumers to spend their money.

Why should they choose your business?

The question itself is incredibly common among business owners. The answer is different for every business; however, if analyzed and used correctly, can yield incredible marketing and sales results.

Connect online.

Every business should strive to start a conversation with customers. Create and maintain a complete online presence with an optimized website, blog, and social media sites. Establish a stellar website with content optimized for search engines and created for the target audience (both written and images).

Produce premium content with the same audience in mind and choose the social media sites that are frequented by those users (use this social media demographic chart as a reference). Regularly update the social media sites with relevant content (i.e. videos, images, written content) that the target audience wants to see—and wants to engage with. In essence, use an online presence to create a connection that converts visitors to customers.

Choose a unique tone.

Snarky, smart, fun, professional, silly. Every business should have a tone that sets them apart and makes them unique. Decide on the tone and use it in every marketing effort (i.e. social media, printed materials, e-mails). A distinctive tone paired with properly branded materials makes a business easily identifiable—even among the industry crowd.

Invest in effective local marketing tactics

Be selective about choosing marketing efforts. The most effective tactics are delivered in ways that the target audience communicates, such as sending printed materials to a more experienced demographic. For a local business, tactics with the highest return-on-investment target a local audience, such as local website optimization and content produced with a local focus. Local website optimization is technology that targets customers around a business location and delivers top organic search results during local searches.

Highlight your local community involvement

As a local business, extra care should be taken to not only identify a target gender and demographic, but also a local audience. This is a distinct difference from a national online retailer’s marketing efforts. Make a concerted effort when marketing to showcase community involvement. Share information about local community events, event sponsorships, and relevant local information.

Answer their questions

Customer conversation should be a two-way discussion. Respond to their comments. Deliver exemplary customer service that goes above and beyond their expectations. Answer inquiries promptly, or let the customer know when to expect a response. When replying, ditch the canned responses; engage with responses that sound human and resolve the customer’s issue.

Showcase your “hook”

Every business has a “hook” that makes it different. Showcase it. Fast customer service, unique products or services, a high level of expertise…determine why customers should spend their hard-earned dollars and communicate with them accordingly. Be open and honest. It’s refreshing—and incredibly effective.

Tips for Keeping Up with Your Marketing Plan

young man runner on a stadium running upstairs like overwhelmed business trying to follow marketing plan“It’s been crazy around here.” It’s one of the most common sayings we hear from our clients—and for good reason. A thriving and growing business is a busy place. It’s easy for the marketing tactics needed to keep growing the business—the social media posts, image collection, reputation management—to get lost in all the buzz. After all, who has time for marketing? If you’re reading this, you can relate—and you can use these tips to keep up with your business marketing.

Don’t over commit to social media.

There are many things a marketing plan should be: effective, measurable, audience-focused. One of the items that often gets overlooked is manageable. While there is some value in ambition, there are also tons of blogs and social media channels abandoned because of a lack of time.

To avoid this, focus your efforts on social media sites where your audience is (use this chart as a reference). Your business does not have to be on every social media channel, especially when there is not enough time to manage all the sites. Put simply, it gives your business a black eye when they come across an abandoned social media site or sends a message through social media that is not answered. Choose your social media sites carefully (or contact a marketing firm that can assist in the process), and allocate your time carefully.

Schedule and automate as needed.

To make the most of your time and execute a solid marketing plan, sign up for a scheduling tool, such as Hootsuite and Buffer that can save you time. This recommendation comes with a warning; don’t schedule social media posts too far ahead of time. Your business needs to stay on top of trending topics. Be flexible with your plan when needed. If you want to stay relevant, share timely content from other sources and links to your original content.

Look for opportunities to be efficient.

As often as possible, organize your efforts. Use a marketing plan as a resource to ensure the efficient collection of information and images with customers and staff members. Include deadlines and responsible parties to the marketing plan to ensure a prompt and seamless execution. Make your marketing a team effort; ask other staff members to send pictures or videos to you to be included in future blog and social media posts.

Don’t hesitate to outsource.

Can’t keep up with a marketing plan? It’s okay to admit that you need assistance with executing all the steps of a multi-channel marketing plan; the first step is identifying whether you need a marketing firm to completely manage your marketing efforts or complement existing efforts. Keep in mind that outsourcing doesn’t have to be an all-or-nothing proposition. If you can keep up with image collection or blog posting, but need assistance (or expertise) with other areas, contact a marketing firm that offers supplemental marketing plans.

Local Business Marketing Checklist: 10 Weekly To Do’s that Get Results

black running shoes on road like marketing marathon for local businessesIf you think marketing your business is a one-time feat, we hate to bust your bubble (but we’re going to). Marketing is a marathon, not a sprint. Marketing—at least, successful marketing that gets results—is a series of actions that connect with customers (and potential customers) and drive them to action.

When business is booming, that marathon can feel like the longest race ever, especially when everyone is short on time (and marketing shouldn’t be entrusted to just anyone). That’s why we’ve put together a list of marketing tasks that should be done on a weekly basis to get to the finish line.

Before tackling weekly tasks, take the time to draft a marketing plan to ensure that the finish line is a set goal. Include information in the plan, such as the target audience, campaigns (that follow the business sales cycle), tactics (i.e. social media, content marketing, etc.) and goal. Create a calendar based on the marketing plan with weekly tasks. Assign each task to a staff member or marketing pro (if outsourcing).

Even with a set marketing calendar, understand that there should be some room for flexibility. Impromptu moments or events that are relevant to the campaign or audience should be included for the benefit of the business. Revisit the calendar on a regular basis to ensure that tasks are being completed. If there are uncompleted tasks, consider outsourcing so every leg of the marathon is finished and the finish line is reached.

In person

___Ask customers for reviews (use these tips for creative ways to ask for reviews).

___Ask customers to follow the company on social media.

___ Provide excellent customer service.

Website

___Add quality content for better optimization.

___Post website link to social media to drive traffic.

___Contact local SEO firm to increase website reach with local customers within 10-50 miles of business (get more information about local website optimization).

___Send out e-mail to customers with links to social media and website (build your email list with these tips).

Social media

___Take photos and video for social media.

___Schedule posts using Facebook, Buffer, or Hootsuite (use these ideas for posts).

___Answer messages from customers and contacts (PROMPTLY-within an hour!-use these tips for social media customer service).

Local Businesses: 30 Ideas for Your Next Social Media Post

customer opening up social media network with posts from local businessWe’ve said it before and we’ll say it again. Marketing for a local business is different than marketing for a national company. That’s especially true when marketing on social media, which gives you the unique ability to connect with your customers about what’s happening in your local community. Is everyone talking about the weather? You can identify better than some national business (and if you’re an HVAC company, answer their weather-related questions!). Is the local buzz about a community event? You’re excited too, and more than willing to share in the fun.

Social media gives local businesses to take part in the local buzz and connect with them between visits (or service calls or appointments or…). And even though businesses are taking advantage, one of the most common questions we hear is, “what can we post to social media?”

Our answer comes with a caveat. Social media posts should be done in accordance with a marketing plan, but with the flexibility to post things that come up during everyday operations. Ideally, a marketing plan should include regular and relevant posts (if you can’t maintain regular posts, contact the marketing pros that can); the definition of regular depends on the social media network. On Facebook, for example, businesses should post once a day to avoid overloading newsfeeds (more can be posted during big events).

Back to the most common question about what to post to social media. This is a list of ideas for social media post that can be included in a local business social media marketing plan:

  1. Photos of new products
  2. Helpful ‘how to’ article
  3. Local news article
  4. Link to local community event the business is part of
  5. Photo of business location
  6. Photo of happy employee working
  7. Photo of employee on anniversary (10 years at business, 5 years…)
  8. Photo of building many years ago
  9. Photo or video on special anniversary day
  10. Video of new product
  11. Unusual or beautiful photo with ask for captions
  12. Photo of founders of company with story about start
  13. Video/slideshow of product from start to finish
  14. Article with frequently asked questions
  15. Post about National Day (i.e. National Donut Day, National Dog Day, etc.)
  16. Reshared post from another business with relevant news
  17. Reshared post of local community news
  18. Photos of event at business
  19. Photos of customers at event (with their permission)
  20. Reshared photos from other businesses at event
  21. Live video of ribbon cutting
  22. Live video of event in progress
  23. Live video of new product arriving
  24. Link to blog post
  25. Link to website page where customers can contact/make an appointment/order
  26. Video or photo of remodeling/construction at building
  27. Photo of area around building during holiday season (i.e. holiday light display, trick-or-treat, etc.)
  28. Graphic with sale information
  29. Promotional video of sale
  30. Flashbacks to past jobs or milestones

What is local website optimization?

man using smartphone to find local businessesMarketing for a local business is different than a national company. Not better or worse, just different.

National and local businesses may have the same goals. They may even target the same audience demographic.

But a potential customer interested in lawn mowers in Texas isn’t going to drive to Wisconsin to purchase. Or for dinner at a Wisconsin restaurant. Or order carpet from a flooring store thousands of miles away. Local franchises are in the same proverbial boat.

But every company should have an online presence, both national and local. This can leave local business owners and sales teams asking, “How can we get our website in front of local customers?”

Trust us. We’ve been asked the question A LOT.

Unfortunately, building a well-designed, easy-to-navigate website is only part of the task. The next step is website optimization, the process of creating a website optimal for search engines. Some website optimization can be accomplished during the building process by optimizing the website structure for search engines.

Website optimization is a continual process. For local businesses, the next website optimization step revolves around targeting local customers (and no, this does not mean listing local community names at the bottom of every page). Basically, the goal of local website optimization is to be found by local customers when they search.

Generally, think of this scenario; a homeowner is looking for new flooring. Instead of pulling out the traditional phone book, the homeowner goes online and searches for local flooring store. Search engines pull up a list of local flooring businesses and information (plus ads) relevant to the search. Local website optimization puts a local flooring store in that list.

Embracing local website optimization

Local website optimization is not a flippant process. Strong (and complete) efforts lead to strong results. Its also a process that should be focused on the audience and search engines; optimized website caters to both. All website content should be created with keywords and topics that potential local customers would use in their search. Simply put, when potential customers have a problem, they look for a solution online. Website optimization provides the answer to the problem, and local optimization technology ensures that content shows up in organic searches (below the ads) by a local audience. If the process sounds like its being communicated in another language, outsource local website optimization efforts to the professionals (use these guidelines for selecting the right optimization pros).

As stated previously, optimization is a continual process. Optimized content added to a website on a regular basis gains credit with both search engines and online users. To target a local audience, produce relevant content that a local audience can relate to and create a promotion plan to reach the target audience.

Establishing a strong online presence

In addition to optimization, creating a strong online presence can play a crucial role in earning key positions on search engines. Taking ownership of business profiles on local review websites (i.e. Yelp, Facebook, Google My Business, etc.) is a necessary step in the endeavor to earn a top spot on search engine pages. As with website optimization, this effort is a continual process. Fortunately (and unfortunately) for businesses, owning these pages comes with positive and negative reviews. Manage these reviews by connecting with a company with brand online management software or use these tips to deal with unhappy customers and request reviews from satisfied customers.

(Highly) Effective Ways to Drive Local Leads to your Sales Team

salesperson conferring with clients using online marketingNothing in the business world exists in a vacuum. Every service, every department, every piece of a company is connected. Marketing is connected to customer service. Customer service is connected to daily operations. Marketing is connected to sales.

Or is it?

Is your marketing integrated into your company sales strategy? Are you investing in marketing that your sales team can use? Are you putting valuable marketing tools in your sales team’s hands?

If not, reconsider. Even the most awesome salesman or woman appreciates solid marketing that they can use to boost sales and improve the bottom line.

Invest in a good website

“Don’t judge a book by its cover” is junk in the business world. The truth is that customers judge a company by first impressions—both in-person, printed, and online—every day. Online, this is especially true for company websites, where a slow-loading or low-quality website leads to high bounce rates. Put simply, if your website is subpar (in design or functionality) or doesn’t load quickly, potential clients and customers leave and move on to other companies with functional websites and sales teams they can contact.

To generate leads for your sales team, build a functional, well-designed website with clear call-to-actions and easy contact forms. Designate a staff member responsible for passing the potential e-mails generated from the website to a member of the sales team, and follow-up to ensure that all contacts are responded to promptly.

Get your website at the top of local search results

Warning: it’s time for another saying that is completely not true in marketing. “If you build it, they will come.” A website is not going to attract visitors on its own (or leads to the sales team); behind every successful online business presence is a well-executed website promotion plan and strategy.

One of the most effective ways to promote a website—and to attract leads for the sales team—is local website optimization. This technology optimizes a company’s website for local keyword searches (in this case, local to business location) on major search engines, such as Google and Bing. There are a lot of marketing agencies that offer the service; select an agency that can show examples of past successes and can provide regular reports of data that indicate ongoing local website optimization success. Local optimization gets local visitors researching relevant services and products to the business website; a well-designed website gets messages that the sales team can follow up on.

Produce content the sales team can use

Another effective way to attract local leads is with visual and well-written content. Content regularly added to a website earns a business extra credit with search engines (who value websites that add fresh high-quality content)—and can serve as the ideal way to build trust with prospective clients.

To achieve the latter, set up a plan of strategic content promotion by every member of the sales team. Train the sales team to use the content in emails (individual or mass communications) or on social media to build trust with prospects.

Make sure the communication goes both ways; ask members of the sales team to not only use the content, but to reciprocate with information that produces relevant content for future communications. Because of their regular contact with prospective clients, salespersons can provide frequently asked questions that can be used to provide quality content (either by company marketing or by a marketing agency) they want to use.

Manage online brand management tools

Prospective clients are researching services and products, and the companies that provide and produce them, with an (alarming) regularity. This trend is only alarming if the company brand is the subject of numerous negative reviews—negative reviews that can play a significant role in the amount of (or lack of) prospects contacting the sales team.

To keep the phone ringing off the hook, take ownership of online reviews. Set up a system for requesting and monitoring online reviews or contact a company with automated brand management software. Respond to all negative and positive reviews; use these tips to respond to negative reviews in a positive manner. View a negative review as an opportunity to showcase stellar customer service. Thank positive reviewers for their input and notify the sales team of all positive reviews so they can use them in their future communications with prospective clients.

Local Businesses: 20 Marketing Ideas that Connect with Customers

local customer with smart phoneAs local business owners, another sale may be the ultimate goal, but a connection with a customer is what gets those sales in the door. With in-person and digital options available, local business owners and managers need to select the right (and most efficient) marketing ideas that form those invaluable connections with local customers.

What is the goal of a customer connection?

A connection with a local customer is more than just a means to another sale—and it’s different for a local business versus a huge national corporation. A local business owner should choose tactics that inspire actions from a customer, such as (but not limited to) a referral, brand awareness, positive reviews, or in-person contact. The desired action should play a key factor in deciding on the type of tactic selected to reach business goals. A marketing professional can also offer advice on the specific tactics right for a local business.

It’s also important to realize that many marketing tactics are more than just a part of a plan; they are an integral part of operations that should be implemented via customer service employees who are the face of the business. This means that local business owners and managers should develop standard operating procedures that are a daily part of business and a standard part of employee trainings.

When its time to outsource local marketing efforts, take that team approach a step further. A marketing firm is an extension of your business’ efforts; contact them regularly with updates and information that can be used for a cohesive execution of all local marketing tactics.

How can I get more connections with my customers?

In-person

  1. Ask customers during customer interactions to follow business on social media
  2. Provide a card or flyer during customer interactions with social media options
  3. Ask customers during customer interactions to sign up for email list
  4. Provide a card with deals and contact information to be included in local community event goodie bags
  5. Ask satisfied customers for online reviews
  6. Give customers a mobile device for payment and for leaving an online review (when service is completed)

Website

  1. Optimize your website so you appear in search engine rankings
  2. Include clear call-to-actions (graphic & text) that ask for social media follows and email list sign-ups
  3. Post content with local news, tips, and information helpful for customers

Social Media

  1. Post pictures of employees doing work or on special occasions (with their approval)
  2. Drive traffic to a specific website page from social media
  3. Share website content relevant to customers’ lives
  4. Respond promptly to messages from customers with helpful advice
  5. Share posts from other local businesses and events
  6. Social media advertisements that target local users

E-mails

  1. Send out personalized e-mails with relevant information
  2. Showcase community involvement and local news pertinent to the community and business

Print

  1. Send out flyers or printed materials to local prospects
  2. Ask other local business owners to carry printed materials

Online Review Sites

  1. Take ownership of business profiles on review sites
  2. Contact a company with brand reputation software that manages positive and negative reviews from all online review sites
  3. Respond to all online reviews (negative and positive)
  4. Provide excellent customer service to customers who leave negative reviews (i.e. assist with resolving issue, offer to help)

Local Marketing Ideas that Put Your Business on the Map

customer paying for product at local businessLocal sales are what every local business owner strives for, but are not always attainable until they hit on the right combination of marketing tactics. To muddy the decision-making process even further, the perfect marketing combination is different for every local business.

Though testing is part of the process, a good marketing strategy minimizes the amount of guesswork. The right strategy can position a brand in front of the right people at the right time. Identifying the “right people” is one of the first steps; a target audience is the key to selecting the right marketing tactics and schedule that increase the bottom line.

Website

Today’s websites are more than online brochures; they are a means to an end, with the end being an online sale or contact. To that end, a website should be created with the ends in mind. The website should be easy to navigate for online users, with content produced for the target audience and easy-to-access contact information and calls to action. A mobile-friendly website used to be a luxury; today, mobile-friendly is a must for any business website. Walk (or run) away from any website design company that suggests otherwise.

Local Optimization

Without promotion, a website is just another page on the internet. Significant effort and planning should be put into website promotion; one of those methods can be done during website creation and continually after it goes live. Optimization is the process of creating content for search engines like Google, Yahoo, and Bing; if done correctly, an optimized website is listed on the first page of search engine results pages for phrases relevant to the business.

For local businesses, there is an added factor: locality. Local optimization services not only get a business at the top of online users’ search results; they get the website ranked at the top of local search results within a radius around the business. Not all optimization services are created equal; contact a local search optimization firm that can show results and data from other clients—and continually produce the data that proves it works.

Content

Optimized web content is only a part of attracting the attention of search engines and users. Regular, high-quality content added to a website continually earns their attention AND can be used in other promotional tools. Regular blog posts, graphics, and video relevant to the target audience (note-they are the key to successful marketing AGAIN). This content can also be used on social media, snail mailings, and in these other business promotion tactics.

Social Media

A connection with customers that walk in the door is vital to sales; an online connection keeps them walking in and gets them to the door. Social media sites like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Instagram are the link. As with every marketing tactic, positioning the business in front of the target audience is the key to success. Before any business blindly dives on social media, some thought should be given to choosing the social media site with the majority of users in the target audience (use this data on social media demographics). No matter what social media site chosen, regular posts get results. Choosing the right social media or sites, and devoting regular efforts to posting, is the formula for a regular connection with customers.

To connect with local customers, post regular content that shows the business is part of the community and takes an interest in local activities. Share news of local events the business is involved in, and pictures of the people in it. With their permission, post photos and videos of employees and customers that are vital to keeping a local business going.

(Snail) Mailings

Mailings to customers and potential customers may not play as vital of a role in modern marketing as in the past, but they are still a solid way (especially when integrated into a marketing campaign) to retain and attract local customers. Always include alternate ways to contact on the mailer, such as a website link and social media address, so customers can communicate on their own schedule and via their preferred means.

E-mail

E-mail is a digital marketing tactic that has one of the highest returns on investment IF sent to e-mail users that want to receive e-mails. Build a strong e-mail list by making in-person and online asks (i.e. via website, social media, etc.). Send relevant e-mails to that list with content valuable to them (not just discounts and offers) on a regular basis. A solid e-mail is relevant, valuable, and creative enough to get users’ attention AND clear call-to-actions that customers can easily use.

Reviews

An online review is more than just a record of a customers’ experience; it’s a marketing tactic that can be utilized to attract customers. Statistics prove that reviews are a valuable marketing tactic. Creating online profiles and ‘owning’ those reviews are an essential part of marketing a local business. Ask for local reviews (use these ideas to get positive reviews) and incorporate them into daily operations. Integrate reviews into your marketing strategy or lean on local marketing pros that have put other businesses on the map.

9 BIG Content Marketing Do’s & Don’ts that Get Results

hands typing on a computer producing contentA freight train. We’ve been around for, well, awhile (20+ years) and we’ve seen marketing on the internet develop and evolve. It’s not a slow process; many online marketing tactics have progressed at an amazing rate (look at social media!)—truly at the speed of a freight train. Content marketing is not immune from the rat race; creating content for marketing has evolved from blogging and producing short content to blogging with a few images to producing multiple types of content strategically that get results. Through it all, the principles of content marketing that get results have not changed—and neither have the “don’ts” that sabotage content marketing results.

Do make a plan.

Content marketing is not a tactic for the faint of heart. While writing a few blog posts or creating a series of graphics may get you short-term results, strategic content that follows a plan with written goals gets continual long-term results. Depending on your goals and tactics, content marketing can gain leads, raise awareness, and drive leads. Before the process of producing content is initiated, make a plan with clear goals, a target audience, and a schedule that follows your sales cycle.

Don’t steal from other sites.

The rules on plagiarism haven’t changed since school. It was wrong to copy other people’s work—even part of an article or work—-and it’s still wrong to duplicate text found on other websites. Beyond an ethical reason, duplicate content can prompt penalties from search engines that can take a significant amount of time to recover from.

Do know who you’re writing for.

A connection with a prospective customer is a valuable asset in your content marketing plan. That link with readers and viewers is not achievable if the content is produced without knowing the target readers. When drafting a content marketing plan, research the ideal target audience (i.e. gender, age group, interests, etc.) and include content ideas relevant to the reader.

Don’t take a “sell, sell, sell!” approach.

Even if the goal of content marketing is lead generation, not every piece of content produced should sound like a walking advertisement. People are surrounded by advertisements screaming at them on a regular basis; create a content calendar with approximately 20-30% produced with a strong selling message. Instead, produce content marketing that solves the reader’s problem and entertains them. Include clear call-to-actions and links directing readers to easy-to-use landing and contact us pages for optimal results.

Do answer customer questions.

Internet users search the internet regularly looking for answers to their problems. Answer them. Include sales staff into the production process on a regular basis. Ask them for frequently asked questions that customers ask often. Once the answer is produced, makes the sales team aware of the content so the content can be utilized on social media, blogs, e-mails, and communications with prospective customers.

Don’t miss a post.

Regular posts on web pages, social media, and blogs are an essential to content marketing success. Sporadic posts do not reach the audience on a regular basis and can negatively impact campaign results. Create a schedule of regular posts and stick to it. Use social media automation tools like Hootsuite or Buffer to efficiently use time and post when the target audience is online. Assign content to a staff member with clear deadlines or outsource the task to a quality content marketing firm that can supplement or manage a comprehensive content marketing plan.

Do post with an image or video.

Numerous studies have shown that blog and social media posts perform better with videos or images. Take those studies to heart; produce videos and images and include them strategically in the content marketing plan.

Don’t hesitate to outsource.

An ambitious content marketing plan is a list of steps: brainstorming topics, writing, creating graphics and video, optimizing for search engines. All of those steps need to be accomplished by the assigned deadline. There is no shame or blame in outsourcing all of part of those efforts; a content marketing firm can produce high-quality, optimized content that meets deadlines. When choosing a content marketing firm, use these tips to ensure that the end result is high-quality content that is optimized for search engines and plays an integral part in accomplishing content marketing goals.

Do use your content.

Content marketing pieces are not and should not be produced in a vacuum. Push it in personalized e-mails to customers (e-mail marketing or via sales staff). Promote it on social media. Use it in online advertising. There are many different tactics for using content, all of which should be utilized and executed.

9 Questions to Ask BEFORE You Jump into Content Marketing

question marks painted on a asphalt road surface signifying seo questionsContent marketing is a powerful marketing tool. Content marketing is as easy as spitting out piece after piece of content. Content marketing starts by diving into a regular schedule of content, images, graphics…

Not so fast.

Successful content marketing requires planning and a solid strategy. Effective content marketing requires asking questions so the ‘jump’ is a graceful dive—not a belly flop.

Strategy Questions

Who is the target audience we are writing for?

The tone of your content, types of content, and topics you choose ride on this question. Determine what group your efforts are targeted at; break it down into gender, general age group, interests, etc.

What is the goal?

Don’t dive into content marketing with a general “we just want more sales” approach. Decide on a goal for your content, such as increasing sales leads, building awareness, or retaining existing customer base. Remember as you create content, that no matter what your goal, not all your content should be a screaming advertisement; subtle content with the right call-to-actions can be just as effective and beneficial.

What schedule should I follow?

Once you have determined your target audience and goal, it’s time to put together a strategic schedule that follows your business sales cycle. For example, if you’re an event venue who wants to generate sales leads, your content calendar should follow the sales cycle. Craft content aimed at company managers who book holiday parties before the holiday season and wedding planning tips before wedding planning season.

Who is in charge of meeting the deadlines?

A successful content marketing calendar is broken down into regular, manageable deadlines. Assign every piece of content to a party that can meet those deadlines. The creator of the content does not need to be in-house; if producing content exceeds the capabilities of your company, consider outsourcing the effort to experts who can meet the deadlines.

How can we promote and use the content?

Content should not be produced in a vacuum. Blog posts should be shared via e-mail, images included in your social media strategy, videos posted in your online library. Have a plan for every piece of content created, the deadline for production, and schedule for promotion.

How can we measure results?

Evaluation is one of the most commonly overlooked steps of content marketing. Decide what analytics should be collected and analyzed periodically to decide the status of your current efforts, and what improvements can be made in the future.

Content Planning Questions

What questions do we frequently hear from customers?

The most effective content topics come from your target audience. Compile a list of frequently asked questions on a regular basis, and insert those questions strategically into your content calendar. These topics are relevant to the customer and answer questions, creating an instant connection that can convert readers into potential customers.

What topics do our customers search for?

If you want relevant topics that earn points with customers and search engines, put yourself in the readers’ shoes and use marketing tools that give you insight into online users’ search activity. Optimized content is a valuable tool for businesses that want to be found in search engines. For local businesses, go a step beyond to differentiate your business by including content and topics related to local users’ interests and community.

What images are needed?

Images are not an online luxury; all types of media are necessary for content marketing success. As you map out your content marketing strategy, brainstorm ways to strategically collect the necessary images needed to make your content marketing a success (if you outsource, that brainstorming is up to the marketing agency).